This post concludes the train of thought that I shared in an earlier post – Why culture is the Achilles Heel of your customer experience efforts (Part I). – I encourage you to read it to get the most out of this post.

Let’s forget morality and focus on ‘workability’.  By ‘workability’ I am addressing the pragmatic dimension.  For example if you want to fly a 747 from London to New York you simply need an airworthy aeroplane, the right fuel, experienced pilots, the right staff etc – these are the conditions of workability for the flight.  If you do not have these in place then your plane may get off the ground but it is highly likely to make it to New York.  So what are the conditions of workability for a customer-centric orientation that builds customer loyalty?

The foundation of customer loyalty is earning and cultivating trust

In a world full of suppliers who offer pretty much the same goods who would you choose to do business with?  If you are like most of humanity then you will instinctively do business with the one that you trust the most. Don Peppers & Martha Rogers have taken a good look at the whole trust thing in their book ‘Rules to Break & Laws to Follow’.   So allow me to share their wisdom with you.  Here are the laws that they recommend that you follow:

1. Earn and keep the trust of your customers

The key point I want to stress here is the word ‘earn’.  Yes, you need to earn it by doing the right thing (honest, fairness, integrity) as well as doing things right (competence, ease, access, efficiency…).  It means paying as much attention to the social and moral aspects as it does the economic aspect. Are you a fit and proper person/organisation?  Which is another way of asking: can you be trusted to act honorably/ethically?

Read the rest of the list here.

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