The latest news in the world of customer experience and customer loyalty.
 
Ringgggggg: New Study Offers a Wake-up Call for Sleepwalking Loyalty Programs
You can’t just a book by its cover, or a loyalty report on the travel industry by its title, but you can catch a lot of attention by the title, and the recent report by Expedia Affiliate Network and Points caught ours: “A Wake-up Call for Sleepwalking Loyalty Programs.” What did the survey find that was so awakening? That brands that primarily rely on discounts and coupons to drive loyalty are about to get left standing at the gate. According to an article in PhocusWire, the key for long-term loyalty for travel brands has shifted to creating memorable experiences based in superior products and personalized service. Discounts and coupons still—for the moment—rank as the top tactic, but “Today’s savvy travelers are looking beyond price as the choose their preferred brands,” Expedia Partner Solutions President Ariane Gorin told PhocusWire. “Lasting loyalty will be won by companies who really tune in to consumer expectations, deliver a diverse product offering and invest in superior user experiences.”
 
British Airways Takes a More Grounded Approach to its Rewards Program
Figure this one out: British Airways uses Avios to administer its reward programs—both of them. The airline has a standard Avios Travel Reward Program, as well as a separate British Airways Executive Club rewards program. So if you were an executive who traveled enough to justify an Executive Club membership, you were banking rewards points in two separate accounts—and you couldn’t merge them. Well, until May 20. Someone finally got wise and combined the two, which turns out to be a bonus for those not in the Executive Club already. Those travelers will now receive the Executive Club benefits, such as being able to spend points on 12 other partner airlines and access to far more hotel and experience options. Rob Burgess, who runs the frequent flier website Head for Points, told Business Insider that the merger was basically an admission of failure by Avios.
 
 
The latest news in the world of customer experience and customer loyalty.
 
Ringgggggg: New Study Offers a Wake-up Call for Sleepwalking Loyalty Programs
You can’t just a book by its cover, or a loyalty report on the travel industry by its title, but you can catch a lot of attention by the title, and the recent report by Expedia Affiliate Network and Points caught ours: “A Wake-up Call for Sleepwalking Loyalty Programs.” What did the survey find that was so awakening? That brands that primarily rely on discounts and coupons to drive loyalty are about to get left standing at the gate. According to an article in PhocusWire, the key for long-term loyalty for travel brands has shifted to creating memorable experiences based in superior products and personalized service. Discounts and coupons still—for the moment—rank as the top tactic, but “Today’s savvy travelers are looking beyond price as the choose their preferred brands,” Expedia Partner Solutions President Ariane Gorin told PhocusWire. “Lasting loyalty will be won by companies who really tune in to consumer expectations, deliver a diverse product offering and invest in superior user experiences.”
 
British Airways Takes a More Grounded Approach to its Rewards Program
Figure this one out: British Airways uses Avios to administer its reward programs—both of them. The airline has a standard Avios Travel Reward Program, as well as a separate British Airways Executive Club rewards program. So if you were an executive who traveled enough to justify an Executive Club membership, you were banking rewards points in two separate accounts—and you couldn’t merge them. Well, until May 20. Someone finally got wise and combined the two, which turns out to be a bonus for those not in the Executive Club already. Those travelers will now receive the Executive Club benefits, such as being able to spend points on 12 other partner airlines and access to far more hotel and experience options. Rob Burgess, who runs the frequent flier website Head for Points, told Business Insider that the merger was basically an admission of failure by Avios.

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